Only 2 potential witnesses to be identified

We are still looking to identify to following persons:

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 18:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 3 and Image 18 are images of the same person.

Suffolk Police – 17th February 2017

A further potential witness has been traced as the investigation into the disappearance of Corrie McKeague continues.

Police have identified the cyclist shown in recently released CCTV images – but are renewing appeals for any information to locate the two remaining individuals seen on foot in the area where Corrie was last seen who have not yet been positively identified  – an older gentleman and a person seen walking through the Brentgovel Street/ ‘horseshoe’ area of Bury St Edmunds around 5.15am – 5.20am on Saturday 24 September.

Both are potential witnesses who could have information that may assist and detectives continue to ask them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

Officers have also been in touch with Corrie’s family today to update them with regards to progress on preparatory work ahead of the landfill site search.

The site itself, at Milton in Cambridgeshire, has to be made safe and accessible before the search work can get underway. This preparatory work has started but this is going to take slightly longer as 8,000 tonnes of bulk material will have to be removed first to allow safe access to where the search needs to take place.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said that work to locate Corrie was continuing both in preparation for the site search and in the enquiries being made.

“The work to trace Corrie remains a priority and we are continuing to progress our investigation as the work around the site search is being planned. It was initially hoped that the search could start next week, but the logistics of building access routes and ensuring the area is safely accessible for those who will be carrying out the work mean further preparatory activity will need to be done first.

“This is a considerable task and we need to ensure everything is in place before officers begin the process of going through the waste in the landfill.  We have been liaising with Corrie’s family around the timescales involved and, while we can’t confirm a start date, this preliminary work will be completed as quickly as possible, so the full scale search can take place.

“Our aim from the start was to find Corrie and we have been carefully going through all lines of enquiry in detail, checking and re-checking information that has been passed to us to discover what happened. We continue to receive assistance from a range of partner agencies, including the RAF, and we are very grateful for their continuing assistance.”

Police have also been reviewing data that has now been provided by a private company employed by Nicola Urquhart to see if this can provide any further information to assist the investigation.

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

The CCTV images below;

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 18:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: [Suffolk Police]

Suffolk Lowland Search & Rescue – Update 15th February 2017

This Sunday sees the 3rd public search taking place with around 40 public volunteers joining members of SULSAR , Norfolk Lowland Search and Rescue, Cambridgeshire Search and Rescue (CamSAR), Essex Search and Rescue – Essex Lowland Search and Rescue and Norfolk & Suffolk 4×4 Response. We will again be assisted by cadaver dogs from as far away as Yorkshire

Dottie , Jake and their team will again be their keeping the teams feed and watered with both hot and cold food all day , this is greatly appreciated by everyone , thank you so much.

Areas around #Mildenhall, #BartonMills will again be searched including farm land, woodland and heath-land.
Those of you who have been informed that you can attend the search please come prepared with the appropriate out door clothing, remember no jeans as they wick water so quickly.
Remember to bring gloves, broom handle type pole for thrashing undergrowth, waterproof clothing.
Once out with a team you need to have sufficient liquid and food to last you several hours.

Please do not attend if you are not feeling well on the day as this will take it out of you.

On another note I would like to thank Colin Davey of Top the Lot gambling who has very generously donated £5000.00 to the team, and following a meeting with Colin has pledged to help and assist the team further with funding and assistance.

Thank you Dottie and her fantastic team of ladies who not only go out in all weathers to feed people living on the streets , but also organised a charity function in Mildenhall Social Club last Saturday that raised an amazing £1293.28 for the SULSAR team. Thanks also to Billy John Cornish and code of conduct of the music and John and the social club for the venue.

Thanks to every one who attended, it was a really good night.
Our thanks continues to go to all the people still donating money to our donate page on our web page www.sulsar.org.uk and purchasing items off the amazon page.

All funds that we receive, every single penny goes towards the running of the team for equipment etc.

What we lack is new information in relation to Corrie, we still have no new information now than we did on the first night, so please help us out and give us something to go on, because someone knows what happened to Corrie and where he is. Please tell so we can return him to his family

Thank you all again

Andy King

Chairman
Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue

Alternatively, you can always donate direct to the team by either;
Texting SSAR01 £1 to 70070
Or
http://virginmoneygiving.com/fund/sulsar
Or by checking out our Wishlist on Amazon
http://www.amazon.co.uk/registry/wishlist/3C4OLIUDQ529U

Source:[Posted by the Suffolk Lowland Search & Rescue]

Reward must be claimed by 5pm on Saturday 18th February 2017

As most of you will be aware, back in early December 2016, a £50,000 reward for information leading to Corrie being found was offered.  This reward was kindly and very generously put forward by a business couple, local to Suffolk.  It was their wish that they remained anonymous.

At this moment in time the offer of a reward hasn’t brought to the fore the information we had hoped for.

Following discussion, we consider it sensible that the offer of a reward should not remain in place indefinately.  As such, we have decided to leave a reward in place for one more week.  On 18th February 2017 the offer of £50,000 reward will be withdrawn.

On behalf of my family, I would wish to publicly thank from the bottom of our heats the couple concerned.  Not only have they offered what would be a life changing sum of money in the shape of the reward, they have also given their time and made great efforts to assist us find Corrie.  We will be forever grateful to them for this.

The numbers to call are 07379 333 024 and 07379 333 025

Suffolk Police – 10th February 2017

Police will be carrying out a search at a landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire as part of ongoing enquiries to try to discover what has happened to missing Corrie McKeague.

Since the start of the investigation police have been working through all possibilities in an ongoing bid to discover where Corrie is. The work has been prioritised with the most likely scenarios being examined in detail and other possibilities also being explored.

One of these lines of enquiry has been in respect of waste collections from the area, known as the horseshoe, around the time of the last sighting of Corrie.

It was known, and CCTV shows, that a waste lorry made a collection in the area a short time after the last confirmed sighting of Corrie and the lorry was seized in the early stages of the enquiry for forensic examination.  This did not reveal any traces of him, however the waste collection has been one line of enquiry police have persisted with and kept under constant review.

Throughout the investigation a search of the site has been a consideration as police have worked through the possible options as to what may have happened to Corrie, with officers looking at the feasibility and logistics of carrying out this search.

The area of the landfill site where waste collected from Bury St Edmunds that morning was deposited has not had further items put onto it since police alerted the site, early in the investigation, to the possibility that this may need to be searched.

The search will be a considerable task. The area identified is more than 920 square metres of waste down to a maximum depth of eight metres and it is estimated that it is likely take a team of specialist search trained police officers six to ten weeks to complete the work required. The safety and welfare of the officers  who will undertake the search and the noise and odour implications for local residents have all been factors that police have to take into consideration.

On-site preparatory work is already underway and the full scale search likely to commence around Wednesday 22 February once this initial work has been completed. The preparation will include building access ways to the area to be searched, carrying out scoping work, and putting appropriate facilities on the site to allow this search to be carried out in a thorough and comprehensive way.

Detectives investigating the case have kept an open mind from the start as to what may have occurred to Corrie and have been working to confirm why and how he went missing.

This has involved a systematic examination of the possible options including using CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Corrie was reported as missing to Suffolk Police at around 3.40pm on Monday 26 September by RAF Honington, having not reported for duty. At that stage the last time he had been seen was 2am on Saturday 24. Work immediately began to try and find him. Police formally publicised him as missing in the early hours of Tuesday 27 September, after basic checks had been carried out.

Since then thousands of hours of police time have been spent on carrying out hundreds of enquiries to try and find him. The work carried out by Suffolk Police has been reviewed by other constabularies and a variety of other organisations have helped in the searches and investigation, including the RAF and Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “This is the next logical step in the investigation. Behind the scenes we have been working systematically through the options and we have examined a very broad range of evidence. This has involved an extensive examination of CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

“Preparation work is already underway for the search and this will be progressed as quickly as possible. There are some measures that we need to put in place before the full search work starts as, in addition to the pressing need to find Corrie, we also have to consider local residents, site workers and the officers who will be carrying out the job of going through the waste.

“We know that physically searching the site has the potential to cause an increase in odour and we hope residents will understand that we and the site owners have taken this into consideration when making a decision to go ahead with the search. However we also hope they will understand why we are doing this as part of our continuing investigation to find Corrie.

“We need to find him and discover what happened to him. While the search may not provide the answers as to what happened it is something we need to do as our investigation continues.”

Police are liaising with Corrie’s family to keep them informed about what is planned, and will also be working to let residents in the area know why the work is being carried out.

Anyone with information about his disappearance is asked to call the incident room at Suffolk Police on 01473 782019.

Source[Suffolk Police]

Police will search landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire

Please take time to read this full update.

Carrying out this search is a massive task. And our gratitude to each individual police officer carrying out this task is immeasurable. This could take up to 8 weeks to conclude, it will be an incredibly difficult time waiting for news each day. Please do not start discussing publicly, on Find Corrie 💙 Facebook group, any theories about anyone being responsible for any possible wrong doing. At this time Corrie is missing, this is one major lead that the police are looking at but as they have told us today,  all other possibilities are still being looked into.

For all your continued support myself, Makeyan, Darroch and our family cannot ever thank you enough x x x

Police will be carrying out a search at a landfill site in Milton in Cambridgeshire as part of ongoing enquiries to try to discover what has happened to missing Corrie McKeague.

Since the start of the investigation police have been working through all possibilities in an ongoing bid to discover where Corrie is. The work has been prioritised with the most likely scenarios being examined in detail and other possibilities also being explored.

One of these lines of enquiry has been in respect of waste collections from the area, known as the horseshoe, around the time of the last sighting of Corrie.

It was known, and CCTV shows, that a waste lorry made a collection in the area a short time after the last confirmed sighting of Corrie and the lorry was seized in the early stages of the enquiry for forensic examination. This did not reveal any traces of him, however the waste collection has been one line of enquiry police have persisted with and kept under constant review.

Throughout the investigation a search of the site has been a consideration as police have worked through the possible options as to what may have happened to Corrie, with officers looking at the feasibility and logistics of carrying out this search.

The area of the landfill site where waste collected from Bury St Edmunds that morning was deposited has not had further items put onto it since police alerted the site, early in the investigation, to the possibility that this may need to be searched.

The search will be a considerable task. The area identified is more than 920 square metres of waste down to a maximum depth of eight metres and it is estimated that it is likely take a team of specialist search trained police officers six to ten weeks to complete the work required. The safety and welfare of the officers who will undertake the search and the noise and odour implications for local residents have all been factors that police have to take into consideration.

On-site preparatory work is already underway and the full scale search likely to commence around Wednesday 22 February once this initial work has been completed. The preparation will include building access ways to the area to be searched, carrying out scoping work, and putting appropriate facilities on the site to allow this search to be carried out in a thorough and comprehensive way.

Detectives investigating the case have kept an open mind from the start as to what may have occurred to Corrie and have been working to confirm why and how he went missing.

This has involved a systematic examination of the possible options including using CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

Corrie was reported as missing to Suffolk Police at around 3.40pm on Monday 26 September by RAF Honington, having not reported for duty. At that stage the last time he had been seen was 2am on Saturday 24. Work immediately began to try and find him. Police formally publicised him as missing in the early hours of Tuesday 27 September, after basic checks had been carried out.

Since then thousands of hours of police time have been spent on carrying out hundreds of enquiries to try and find him. The work carried out by Suffolk Police has been reviewed by other constabularies and a variety of other organisations have helped in the searches and investigation, including the RAF and Suffolk Lowland Search and Rescue.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said; “This is the next logical step in the investigation. Behind the scenes we have been working systematically through the options and we have examined a very broad range of evidence. This has involved an extensive examination of CCTV, phone and social media analysis, searches, media appeals, talking to those who had contact with Corrie, investigating his background and social life and tracing those who were out in Bury St Edmunds at the time of the last sighting – 3.25am on Saturday 24 September.

“Preparation work is already underway for the search and this will be progressed as quickly as possible. There are some measures that we need to put in place before the full search work starts as, in addition to the pressing need to find Corrie, we also have to consider local residents, site workers and the officers who will be carrying out the job of going through the waste.

“We know that physically searching the site has the potential to cause an increase in odour and we hope residents will understand that we and the site owners have taken this into consideration when making a decision to go ahead with the search. However we also hope they will understand why we are doing this as part of our continuing investigation to find Corrie.

“We need to find him and discover what happened to him. While the search may not provide the answers as to what happened it is something we need to do as our investigation continues.”

Police are liaising with Corrie’s family to keep them informed about what is planned, and will also be working to let residents in the area know why the work is being carried out.

Anyone with information about his disappearance is asked to call the incident room at Suffolk Police on 01473 782019.

Suffolk Police – 2nd February 2017

Police are renewing appeals to trace three people captured on CCTV around the time of the last confirmed sighting of missing Corrie McKeague.

Following previous appeals, police still need to trace two individuals shown on CCTV – a cyclist and an older gentleman – as potential witnesses. A name had been given for the older gentleman but the named individual has been traced and was found not to be the man pictured. Work continues to positively identify the cyclist too, and police are renewing appeals for either of these men to come forward or anyone who can help to get in touch.

Police are now releasing a further image of a person who also needs to be identified.

On December 8 police released some CCTV images of figures seen in the vicinity of the ‘horseshoe’ between 3.15am and 5.20am on Saturday 24 September. Police have been trying to find better images of these individuals, leading to the release of the further images on January 13. Now a better image of one person, believed to feature in the images released on December 8, as being in the area around 5.15 – 5.20am, has been obtained and this is also being released to see if the person can be identified.

These are the last of the individuals seen on foot in the area between these times that have yet to be traced.

All of those featured in the CCTV images issued are potential witnesses who could have information that might assist and detectives are asking them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said that work to locate Corrie continues to be a priority.

“This case has been managed in the same way as any other major investigation undertaken by the Joint Norfolk and Suffolk Major Investigations Team. This means that all information is managed on the computer system used to assist major investigations, that those people involved in the investigation have the correct level of training and the investigation has been overseen and resourced in accordance with national guidance on major investigations.

“We have had to work through the information provided in a logical way and follow systematic processes to ensure everything is looked at in detail. This has involved re-visiting and going over much of the work we have carried out too.

“Our aim from the outset has been to find Corrie. To that end we have searched extensively the places where he was likely to be found. Some locations have been searched more than once using specially trained officers, dogs and technical equipment, and this is normal practice in searches of this kind. The initial most likely scenario was that Corrie had tried somehow to get home from Bury St Edmunds and had come to harm and to that end searches focussed on the areas where he may have been had he tried to get back to RAF Honington.

“Later in the investigation more detailed searches have been carried out and some places have been re-visited. Our search strategy has been reviewed by peers, by another force and advice has been sought from the police national search advisor. As in any major investigation the search strategy remains under review as the case progresses and different scenarios become more or less likely or new information becomes available.

“We have also prioritised the viewing of CCTV for the places where Corrie was most likely to be seen and then worked out from there. A systematic approach gives assurance that he has not been missed on CCTV as some of the images are not clear and need to be viewed multiple times and by trained operatives to gain this level of assurance. We have tested the CCTV to see whether there is any way that he could have left the horseshoe area without being seen. We have identified nearly all of the people who were in the horseshoe area either shortly before or after Corrie went in there. As other locations have come into the investigation we have reviewed CCTV from these places to see if it assists the case.

“Over £300,000 has so far been spent on the investigation and we are putting every effort into finding Corrie. We have drawn on local and national experts and have been open to review by other forces and have continued to resource the search to find Corrie. The activities we have undertaken to date have been based on information and facts and not on assumptions.

“Although at this stage we have not received any information from the company employed by Nicola Urquhart, as soon as we receive any information that the company chooses to pass to the police this will be considered as part of the ongoing enquiry.  Any details coming into the investigation will be checked across the information held, and we continue to work in partnership with a number of agencies including the RAF on the continuing enquiry.

“What is crucially important is that the public provide any information they have about Corrie’s disappearance directly to the police in order that it can be properly recorded and investigated. The police don’t want to miss that vital piece of information that may help them to find Corrie.”

Any information relating to Corrie’s disappearance or about the potential witnesses should be passed to the incident room on 01473 782019. Alternatively you can call 101 and ask to speak to the team.

The CCTV images below;

CCTV image 8 (Please note that it is just the cyclist that needs to be identified):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 18:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 3:

3 People to be identified

UPDATE…..
PLEASE DO NOT IDENTIFY PEOPLE BY NAME ON THE Find Corrie 💙 GROUP.
ANY NAMES…. PLEASE CONTACT SUFFOLK POLICE.

Police are renewing appeals to trace three people captured on CCTV around the time of the last confirmed sighting of missing Corrie McKeague.

Following previous appeals, police still need to trace two individuals shown on CCTV – a cyclist and an older gentleman – as potential witnesses. A name had been given for the older gentleman but the named individual has been traced and was found not to be the man pictured. Work continues to positively identify the cyclist too, however police are renewing appeals for either of these men to come forward or anyone who can help to get in touch.

Police are now releasing a further image of a person who also needs to be identified.

On December 8 police released some CCTV images of figures seen in the vicinity of the ‘horseshoe’ between 3.15am and 5.20am on Saturday 24 September. Police have been trying to find better images of these individuals, leading to the release of the further images on January 13. Now a better image of one person, believed to feature in the images released on December 8, as being in the area around 5.15 – 5.20am, has been obtained and this is also being released to see if the person can be identified.

These are the last of the individuals seen on foot in the area between these times that have yet to be traced.

All of those featured in the CCTV images issued are potential witnesses who could have information that can assist and detectives are asking them or anyone who knows who they are to get in touch.

In relation to identifying the people featured below. Please contact the MIT team on 01473 782019 or suffolk police on 101.

CCTV image 8 (Please note that it is just the cyclist that needs to be identified):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 26:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 18:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCTV image 3:

Herald Scotland – Military-style software systems

Military-style software systems being used to map out hours before Corrie McKeague disappeared.

MILITARY-STYLE software systems are being used to meticulously plot every aspect of missing Scots RAF man Corrie McKeague’s final six hours before he disappeared.

Scots ex-serviceman turned entrepreneur Forbes McKenzie, who runs McKenzie Intelligence Services (MIS), has been employed by the missing man’s mother, Nicola Urqhart, to help find the 23-year-old. Mr McKeague, from Dunfermline, Fife, disappeared last September after a night out in Bury St Edmonds, Suffolk.

Mr McKenzie has responded to attacks on his business’s credibility that emerged over the weekend, along with criticisms of his involvement with the family.

Concerns raised by members of the public, an investigating watchdog and Mr McKeague’s father had been previously reported in relation to MIS’s involvement in the investigation. It was incorrectly estimated the firm had been given £50,000 to carry out its work, which had been raised online.

The firm, staffed by former military personnel, provides specialist maps overlaid with information from social media using state-of-the-art software and satellite images. Mr McKenzie stressed his company “is not a private investigation firm” and added he was paid “nowhere near £50,000”.

The 39-year-old, who is originally from Hawick but now lives in London, said: “What the family has asked us to do is to make maps for every aspect of the case. That includes Corrie’s final footsteps in those last six hours he was seen, including areas searched and not searched, to what level and extent things have been searched.

“In terms of social media, you only need to go near the Find Corrie Facebook site to see the level of interest. There are 110,000 people who have been talking about it. Our job is to sort all of the conversations out on the various social media platforms, going right back to the event, and compile it in such a way that it can be handed across to the police and they can exploit it using their own software.

“It’s a lot of processing. We are not private investigators, and we haven’t been employed to do that.

“The family are police people, the stepfather is a former police investigator. They are competent in doing their own investigation. What they get from me is social media collation and map-making.”

Ms Urquhart, Mr McKeague’s mother, said: “Since the inception of the Facebook page, the web page, Twitter and the phone [lines] we have amassed a vast amount of information in a format I have never seen gathered to this extent in any police investigation.

“I worked with the police in trying to find ways of providing this information to them. However, nothing appeared to work. I was not willing to allow this information not to be collated so went about trying to find someone that would be able to do this for us.

“MIS have been able to do everything I have asked of them and more and they have done this all at a fraction of the cost it should be.”

[Source: Herald Scotland]

What now? – Update 30th January 2017

The initial Collection & Collation activity is not quite complete. As soon as it is, the collection plan begins again and we go round the cycle again…rinse and repeat until we #findcorrie.

To those who are helping – Update 30th January 2017

To Cheryl and Wayne at the Bull Inn, Jo Leach, Andy & the whole team at SULSAR, to all the other people who have got in touch and offered us their time and expertise, from Specialist Dogs, aircraft, TV screen vans and so many more…. Sincerely and humbly, thank you all.

April asked us to pass on her thanks for the well wishes she has received for her and baby. They are both doing well with the support of her and our families and friends.

And, it’s been a while since he was mentioned, so there may be some on here who don’t know – this page was originally set up by Jake Game, a young man from Bury St Edmunds who took it upon himself to do something to help when he first heard that a Serviceman had disappeared in his home town of Bury St Edmunds. It was a completely altruistic act – thank you Jake, 118,000 thank you’s.

For his next challenge, Jake is throwing himself along with a friend out of a perfectly serviceable aircraft to raise money for sulsar! He also starts his new job this Sunday – we are delighted for him; he will be an asset to any employer. Best of luck with both mate.

To C&L – thank you so much.

The Suffolk Police MIT – Thank you – Update 30th January 2017

Thank you. I haven’t actually said it publicly before. We know the problem is budgets from central government, not desire or capability from the force.

Media – Update 30th January 2017

The family has maintained excellent relationships with those reputable news channels/outlets from the outset that are genuinely trying to help us raise the profile of our search for Corrie. We would like to recognize their professionalism and pass on our thanks for all their help so far.

To the #findcorrie Twitter and FB self-appointed ‘broadcast’ team – I say this every update! For your tireless, unseen and unrewarded efforts of raising people’s awareness that Corrie is still missing – one hashtag at a time. Thank you so much.

Fake Profiles and Accusations – Update 30th January 2017

REALLY?
The next section is somewhat surreal to include, but it seems there is a need to say it for the benefit of one of the web forums which doesn’t seem to want to let fact get in the way of their theories! Rather than go the libel route, we’ll just state it here publicly (I won’t post the screen shots we have that identify the fake profiles that have been used, including the ones pretending to be me and Nicola).

[In Nicola’s own words]. For those that believe Darroch drove to Bury to kill or hide his brother; Darroch was in Dunfermline in his bed (this can be proved as his phone would be registered on the mast) talking to his brother on the Friday night.  Darroch was then at his work at 0700 hours on the Saturday until 1700 hours.  This can be corroborated by endless people and cctv.. It takes 7 hours to drive to Bury.  To those who support the pages and people that make comments like this about a 21 year old who is missing his best friend and brother, words fail me. they don’t actually fail me, but it most certainly would not be dignified to write it.

Vehicles – Update 30th January 2017

4 Vehicles (including the Bin Lorry) were seen in the Horseshoe area in the time window (between 0300 – 0500hrs) of interest. All of the vehicles have been identified. All of the drivers have been identified and spoken to. Active investigation into at least 2 of them continues.

There are a number of other vehicles that were identified between 0500 – 1600hrs, investigation continues.

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